Dear Curator

Dear Curator,

I apologize for my somewhat late reply. I was working against the clock to finish my work for our upcoming exhibition and therefore I didn’t have the time to follow up on our correspondence until now. As you probably know, creating art is a nerve-wracking activity, which requires full dedication and therefore is a fulltime occupation. As always, I have been working solitary nightshifts exploring the depths of my mind in an attempt to reveal the undercurrent of my psyche.

Previously, you asked me if I could send you an artist biography of 100 words or 500 letters as quickly as possible. Unfortunately I did not succeed at this task, as 100 words seem too concise to describe my work and really would be limiting to the complexity of my artistic practice. Therefore, 500 letters seems to me the best idea. But, since this will take much more time than currently available, I’m forced to ask for a postponement.

In the meantime, I have found this application that from now on will take over these inessential tasks for me and I hope this can be a useful tool for artists who find themselves in a similar situation.

In anticipation of our further correspondence, you can consider this my first letter.

Sincerely,

SaveMe Oh

22 thoughts on “Dear Curator

  1. SaveMe Oh

    SaveMe Oh (°1983, Ohoopee, Japan) creates performances, photos, performances and media art. With a conceptual approach, Oh finds that movement reveals an inherent awkwardness, a humour that echoes our own vulnerabilities. The artist also considers movement as a metaphor for the ever-seeking man who experiences a continuous loss.
    Her performances directly respond to the surrounding environment and uses everyday experiences from the artist as a starting point. Often these are framed instances that would go unnoticed in their original context. By demonstrating the omnipresent lingering of a ‘corporate world’, her works references post-colonial theory as well as the avant-garde or the post-modern and the left-wing democratic movement as a form of resistance against the logic of the capitalist market system.
    Her works isolate the movements of humans and/or objects. By doing so, new sequences are created which reveal an inseparable relationship between motion and sound. By questioning the concept of movement, she tries to approach a wide scale of subjects in a multi-layered way, likes to involve the viewer in a way that is sometimes physical and believes in the idea of function following form in a work.
    Her works demonstrate how life extends beyond its own subjective limits and often tells a story about the effects of global cultural interaction over the latter half of the twentieth century. It challenges the binaries we continually reconstruct between Self and Other, between our own ‘cannibal’ and ‘civilized’ selves. SaveMe Oh currently lives and works in Two Fish.

  2. Rose Borchovski

    Rose Borchovski makes installations and mixed media artworks. By emphasising aesthetics, Borchovski seduces the viewer into a world of ongoing equilibrium and the interval that articulates the stream of daily events. Moments are depicted that only exist to punctuate the human drama in order to clarify our existence and to find poetic meaning in everyday life.
    Her installations appear as dreamlike images in which fiction and reality meet, well-known tropes merge, meanings shift, past and present fuse. Time and memory always play a key role. By applying a poetic and often metaphorical language, she wants to amplify the astonishment of the spectator by creating compositions or settings that generate tranquil poetic images that leave traces and balances on the edge of recognition and alienation.
    Her works sometimes radiate a cold and latent violence. At times, disconcerting beauty emerges. The inherent visual seductiveness, along with the conciseness of the exhibitions, further complicates the reception of their manifold layers of meaning.

    • You are a terrible stupid woman Rose Borchovski! How come you banned me on LEA23 before i even went there? You are no good, and you know that. SaveMe Oh better don’t cry no more about banning, With this kind of friends she don’t need enemies no more

  3. Penumbra Carter

    Penumbra Carter (°2007, United States) is an artist who works in a variety of media. By putting the viewer on the wrong track, Carter tries to create works in which the actual event still has to take place or just has ended: moments evocative of atmosphere and suspense that are not part of a narrative thread. The drama unfolds elsewhere while the build-up of tension is frozen to become the memory of an event that will never take place.
    Her artworks are given improper functions: significations are inversed and form and content merge. Shapes are dissociated from their original meaning, by which the system in which they normally function is exposed. Initially unambiguous meanings are shattered and disseminate endlessly.

    • Ush Underwood

      Ush Underwood (Fish) is an artist who works in a variety of media. By referencing romanticism, grand-guignolesque black humour and symbolism, Underwood uses a visual vocabulary that addresses many different social and political issues. The work incorporates time as well as space – a fictional and experiential universe that only emerges bit by bit.
      Her artworks never shows the complete structure. This results in the fact that the artist can easily imagine an own interpretation without being hindered by the historical reality. By merging several seemingly incompatible worlds into a new universe, she tries to increase the dynamic between audience and author by objectifying emotions and investigating the duality that develops through different interpretations.
      Her works bear strong political references. The possibility or the dream of the annulment of a (historically or socially) fixed identity is a constant focal point. By examining the ambiguity and origination via retakes and variations, she creates work through labour-intensive processes which can be seen explicitly as a personal exorcism ritual. They are inspired by a nineteenth-century tradition of works, in which an ideal of ‘Fulfilled Absence’ was seen as the pinnacle.
      Her works are often classified as part of the new romantic movement because of the desire for the local in the unfolding globalized world. However, this reference is not intentional, as this kind of art is part of the collective memory. Ush Underwood currently lives and works in Two Fish.

  4. Clovis Luik

    Clovis Luik (°1955, Rochester, United States) creates media artworks and photos. By parodying mass media by exaggerating certain formal aspects inherent to our contemporary society, Luik investigates the dynamics of landscape, including the manipulation of its effects and the limits of spectacle based on our assumptions of what landscape means to us. Rather than presenting a factual reality, an illusion is fabricated to conjure the realms of our imagination.

    His media artworks establish a link between the landscape’s reality and that imagined by its conceiver. These works focus on concrete questions that determine our existence. By exploring the concept of landscape in a nostalgic way, he makes works that can be seen as self-portraits. Sometimes they appear idiosyncratic and quirky, at other times, they seem typical by-products of American superabundance and marketing.

    His works are saturated with obviousness, mental inertia, clichés and bad jokes. They question the coerciveness that is derived from the more profound meaning and the superficial aesthetic appearance of an image. By examining the ambiguity and origination via retakes and variations, he tries to increase the dynamic between audience and author by objectifying emotions and investigating the duality that develops through different interpretations.

    His works never shows the complete structure. This results in the fact that the artist can easily imagine an own interpretation without being hindered by the historical reality. Clovis Luik currently lives and works in Turtle Island.

  5. Mimesis Monday (Heidi Dahlsveen) is a professional observer who borrow elements from voyeurism. By removing the devastating irony she assumes a naive attitude and uses the sampling method when she enters into a work of art as a receiver. She goes into an intence dialoge and detaches the work of art from history and the artist’s attitude towards her own work and leans against Kant’s philosophy on aesthetic experience where beauty should arouse pleasure. She seeks the Copernican turn in the artwork itself. She opens up to the artwork and let the narrative flow towards her, then she places herself as the main character in the story. The overall topology must reach her within a temporality of 3 minutes before she goes on to the next artpiece. It is to emphasize that Mimesis Monday does not distinguish between real and virtual aesthetic experience.
    She never needs to give the artist feedback when she considers this of little relevance in relation to the copia she builds up. She is the main character in the work, not the artist.

  6. Kandinsky Beamont

    Kandinsky Beamont is an artist who works in a variety of media. By putting the viewer on the wrong track, Beamont often creates several practically identical works, upon which thoughts that have apparently just been developed are manifested: notes are made and then crossed out again, ‘mistakes’ are repeated.
    Her artworks are on the one hand touchingly beautiful, on the other hand painfully attractive. Again and again, the artist leaves us orphaned with a mix of conflicting feelings and thoughts. By rejecting an objective truth and global cultural narratives, she creates with daily, recognizable elements, an unprecedented situation in which the viewer is confronted with the conditioning of his own perception and has to reconsider his biased position.
    Her work urge us to renegotiate art as being part of a reactive or – at times – autistic medium, commenting on oppressing themes in our contemporary society. By manipulating the viewer to create confusion, she tries to create works in which the actual event still has to take place or just has ended: moments evocative of atmosphere and suspense that are not part of a narrative thread. The drama unfolds elsewhere while the build-up of tension is frozen to become the memory of an event that will never take place.

      • ˙sʇuǝlɐʌınbǝ ɔıɟıʇuǝıɔs ɹɐlndod puɐ ’uoıʇɔıɟ-ʇɔɐɟ‘ ‘sǝıɹɐʇuǝɯnɔop ƃuıɔuǝɹǝɟǝɹ ʎq puɐ uoısıɔǝɹd ɔıɟıʇuǝıɔs-ısɐnb puɐ ɥɔɐoɹddɐ ɔıpǝɐdolɔʎɔuǝ uɐ ƃuısn ʎq ʎʇıʌıʇɔǝɾqo puɐ ʎʇıɔıʇuǝɥʇnɐ sɐ ɥɔns sʇdǝɔuoɔ ɟo uoıʇɐƃıʇsǝʌuı uɐ ǝɹɐ sʞɹoʍʇɹɐ lɐnʇdǝɔuoɔ sıH
        ˙ʎɹoʇsıɥ ’ǝsılɐuoıʇɔıɟ‘ sǝʇopɔǝuɐ ɹǝɥʇǝɥʍ uoıʇsǝnb ǝɥʇ puɐ sǝıɹoʇs ’ǝʌısnlɔuoɔ‘ ɹoɟ pǝǝu uɐɯnɥ ǝɥʇ ɥʇoq ɟo uoıʇɐuıɯɐxǝ uɐ uı sʇlnsǝɹ uǝʇɟo sıɥ┴ ˙ʎɹoɯǝɯ puɐ ǝʌıɥɔɹɐ ɟo sʇɔǝɾqns pǝʇɐlǝɹ ʎlǝsolɔ ǝɥʇ uo sʇɔǝlɟǝɹ uossooפ ‘sʞɹoʍʇɹɐ snoɯouoʇnɐ ǝʇɐǝɹɔ oʇ sʇuǝɯnɔop punoɟ ɟo ǝʌıɥɔɹɐ ƃuıʍoɹƃ-ɹǝʌǝ uɐ ƃuısn ʎq ˙sǝıƃǝʇɐɹʇs ʎɹɐɹodɯǝʇuoɔ ɥʇıʍ sʞɹoʍ ʎluıɐɯ oɥʍ ʇsıʇɹɐ uɐ sı (uǝpǝʍS) uossooפ lǝdɯ∀

        uossooפ lǝdɯ∀

  7. Apmel Gooson

    Apmel is by some artists mistakenly known as ”an old branch”, but branching is not a good metaphor. That is UPSIDE DOWN. A better mental image for Apmel’s multiverse is a rubber sheet that gets little bubbles within it; those bubbles grow over time and interact with each other. There never gets to be any more rubber, but it gets more and more bubbles in it as the worlds get more different from each other. And this special rubber is continuous, so it can be sliced thinner by these bubbles indefinitely. The rest of the sheet has no idea that a bubble has formed in a certain area until that bubble reaches it; by which time lots of other bubbles have interacted with it and distorted it beyond its original binary bifurcation. That is the “contagion” metaphor. Differentiation is “contagious” by interaction. If you interact with Apmel you most unlikely will ever again find yourself under the same cosy rubbersheet you’ve grown accustomed to. NO NEED FOR RELIGION to be a moral or artistic bubble in the rubber!

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